The Oklahoma City Law firm, Burton Law Group, P.C., was founded by the Late Lew Gravitt in 1992. Today, the firm is the people’s choice for personal injury attorneys, social security attorneys, and workers compensation attorneys. The firm serves all of Oklahoma and has offices in Oklahoma City, Walters, and Tulsa.

There are many attorneys in Oklahoma City but our firm gives every case the attention it deserves. You are not just another case in our office but rather someone we will treat like a family member. We will work tirelessly to pursue the benefits you are entitled to and we remain accessible throughout your case. Whether you have a car accident, social security disability claim, or workers compensation claim, we are here to help. People choose our law firm over others because we are extremely passionate about pursuing the rights of our clients – and about pursuing the maximum compensation possible under the law. We approach the case in a very personal manner. We talk to our clients, answer their questions and keep them updated throughout the legal process. Passion for Oklahoma City and the people who make it a great place to live.

Burton Law Group can provide services in a broad range of areas:

  • Auto Accidents
  • Construction Accidents
  • Medical Practice
  • Personal Injury
  • Truck Accidents
  • Bankruptcy
  • Defective Product Injury
  • Nursing Home Abuse
  • Defective Product Injury
  • Slip and Fall Injuries
  • Workers Compensation
  • Boat Accidents
  • Employment Law
  • On the Job Injuries
  • Social Security Disability
  • Wrongful Death

We’re also passionate about our town, Oklahoma City, and the people who make Oklahoma a great place to live. Naturally, we are keen to pursue the rights of our people. We will always answer any questions you have regarding your case and utilize our resources to obtain the best outcome possible for you.

In 2016, our firm was instrumental in helping undo a great injustice passed into law at the request of a few irresponsible employers. The Oklahoma Supreme Court struck down the Opt Out Act on September 13, 2016, as an unconstitutional special law. Dillard’s department store opted out of the Oklahoma Workers Compensation Act when it became lawful to do so on February 1, 2014. Subsequently, many injured workers were denied benefits that would have otherwise been due under the Workers’ Compensation Act. Employers were allowed to deny claims and if the employee sought an appeal the appeal was decided by Dillard’s much like the fox watching the hen house.

Though there are no guarantees, with the Burton Law Group, P.C., you can be confident that you have a capable and tenacious law firm at your side. We will devote our time, dedication, and all the resources necessary to pursue the best possible outcome for you.

Phone (800) 257-5533(800) 257-5533 for a free consultation with an Oklahoma City injury lawyer from The Burton Law Group, P.C.

workers compensation

One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them.

BY LATE AFTERNOON, the smell from the Case Farms chicken plant in Canton, Ohio, is like a pungent fog, drifting over a highway lined with dollar stores and auto parts shops. When the stink is at its ripest, it means that the day’s 180,000 chickens have been slaughtered, drained of blood, stripped of feathers and carved into pieces — and it’s time for workers like Osiel López Pérez to clean up. On April 7, 2015, Osiel put on bulky rubber boots and a white hard hat, and trained a pressurized hose on the plant’s stainless steel machines, blasting off the leftover grease, meat, and blood.

A Guatemalan immigrant, Osiel was just weeks past his 17th birthday, too young by law to work in a factory. A year earlier, after gang members shot his mother and tried to kidnap his sisters, he left his home, in the mountainous village of Tectitán, and sought asylum in the United States. He got the job at Case Farms with a driver’s license that said his name was Francisco Sepulveda, age 28. The photograph on the ID was of his older brother, who looked nothing like him, but nobody asked any questions.

Osiel sanitized the liver giblet chiller, a tublike contraption that cools chicken innards by cycling them through a near-freezing bath, then looked for a ladder, so that he could turn off the water valve above the machine. As usual, he said, there weren’t enough ladders to go around, so he did as a supervisor had shown him: He climbed up the machine, onto the edge of the tank, and reached for the valve. His foot slipped; the machine automatically kicked on. Its paddles grabbed his left leg, pulling and twisting until it snapped at the knee and rotating it 180 degrees so that his toes rested on his pelvis. The machine “literally ripped off his left leg,” medical reports said, leaving it hanging by a frayed ligament and a five-inch flap of skin. Osiel was rushed to Mercy Medical Center, where surgeons amputated his lower leg.

Back at the plant, Osiel’s supervisors hurriedly demanded workers’ identification papers. Technically, Osiel worked for Case Farms’ closely affiliated sanitation contractor, and suddenly the bosses seemed to care about immigration status. Within days, Osiel and several others — all underage and undocumented — were fired.

Though Case Farms isn’t a household name, you’ve probably eaten its chicken. Each year, it produces nearly a billion pounds for customers such as Kentucky Fried Chicken, Popeyes, and Taco Bell. Boar’s Head sells its chicken as deli meat in supermarkets. Since 2011, the U.S. government has purchased nearly $17 million worth of Case Farms chicken, mostly for the federal school lunch program.

Case Farms plants are among the most dangerous workplaces in America. In 2015 alone, federal workplace safety inspectors fined the company nearly $2 million, and in the past seven years, it has been cited for 240 violations. That’s more than any other company in the poultry industry except Tyson Foods, which has more than 30 times as many employees. David Michaels, the former head of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, called Case Farms “an outrageously dangerous place to work.” Four years before Osiel lost his leg, Michaels’s inspectors had seen Case Farms employees standing on top of machines to sanitize them and warned the company that someone would get hurt. Just a week before Osiel’s accident, an inspector noted in a report that Case Farms had repeatedly taken advantage of loopholes in the law and given the agency false information. “The company has a 25-year track record of failing to comply with federal workplace safety standards,” Michaels said.

Case Farms has built its business by recruiting some of the world’s most vulnerable immigrants, who endure harsh and at times illegal conditions that few Americans would put up with. When these workers have fought for higher pay and better conditions, the company has used their immigration status to get rid of vocal workers, avoid paying for injuries and quash dissent. Thirty years ago, Congress passed an immigration law mandating fines and even jail time for employers who hire unauthorized workers, but trivial penalties and weak enforcement have allowed employers to evade responsibility. Under President Obama, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agreed not to investigate workers during labor disputes. Advocates worry that President Trump, whose administration has targeted unauthorized immigrants, will scrap those agreements, emboldening employers to simply call ICE anytime workers complain.

While the president stirs up fears about Latino immigrants and refugees, he ignores the role that companies, particularly in the poultry and meatpacking industry, have played in bringing those immigrants to the Midwest and the Southeast. The newcomers’ arrival in small, mostly white cities experiencing an industrial decline, in turn, helped foment the economic and ethnic anxieties that brought Trump to the office. Osiel ended up in Ohio by following a generation of indigenous Guatemalans, who have been the backbone of Case Farms’ workforce since 1989, when a manager drove a van down to the orange groves and tomato fields around Indiantown, Florida, and came back with the company’s first load of Mayan refugees.

About Brandon Burton

Our legal team brings you a wealth of experience in car accident, social security disability, workers compensation and employment cases. We can also handle bankruptcies for businesses and individuals.

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